Honduras Agreement

The agreement is the most recent of the so-called asylum cooperation agreements concluded by the Trump administration. They aim to reduce U.S. migration by sending asylum seekers who hope to seek asylum in the U.S. to a Central American country to assert rights instead. Migrants seeking asylum in the United States can be sent to Honduras under a new agreement between the two countries. The Trump administration began sending migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico to Guatemala last year as part of a similar deal. Earlier this year, the government said the new Agreement on Honduras could include asylum seekers from Guatemala, El Salvador, Brazil and Nicaragua. WASHINGTON — Today, the Department of Homeland Security released the “Asylum Cooperation Agreement” between the United States and Honduras, a move that could indicate plans to advance the highly flawed agreement on sending asylum seekers to Honduras, a country far from safe, during the global coronavirus pandemic. The government has said the deals would reduce dangerous travel by asylum seekers to the United States, with critics saying they oppose international law and send migrants to countries ill-equipped to care for them. “This government`s agreement to send refugees to one of the world`s most dangerous countries has always been a terrible idea and its implementation would be ruthless at this point,” said Eleanor Acer of Human Rights First. “Honduras has failed miserably to protect the lives and human rights of its own citizens. There is simply no credible reason to believe that Honduras will actually protect refugees seeking asylum from other countries, be it Guatemala, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Cuba or elsewhere.

The Trump administration`s claim that Honduras is a safe country for asylum seekers is more than absurd and will put lives at risk. This agreement is not only contrary to the United States. and international refugee law, but the fact that the Trump administration is sending vulnerable people to an uncertain place in the midst of a global pandemic is barbaric. In January, Honduras announced that it had agreed to take in asylum seekers from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Brazil and Nicaragua under the agreement, while the extended terms of the agreement could apply to nationals of any country (except Honduras) . . . .